What types of educational setting can register?

  • Primary schools
  • Secondary schools
  • Special schools
  • Pupil Referral Units

We are unfortunately no longer able to take registrations from Early Years settings. We have recently had a huge amount of interest from settings and we do not yet have the capacity to provide the specialist support and guidance required or to assess settings in this phase.

Who else can register?

  • Local authorities
  • Members of UK educational organisations who are interested in children's rights

Registration charge

In order to be able to provide centralised support for schools, there is a charge of £200 for schools to register. The registration charge can be paid in instalments if this helps. Registration costs for schools with less than 50 pupils are £50.

The one-off registration charge covers the central support provided to schools over the full duration of their rights-respecting journey. The registration charge allows us to support schools with services including:

  • The RRSA Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) support website including digital versions of some of our print resources
  • Half termly email newsletters letting you know about training and support options, teaching resources and RRSA school successes
  • Central administrative email and telephone support
  • A monitoring database to help us track your school’s progress and provide appropriate support interventions

As a registered charity we rely entirely on voluntary donations to fund our vital work for children and their rights. Our RRSA programme does not make a profit – it simply aims to cover our running costs.

We want interested schools to be able to become rights-respecting. Please contact us if the registration fee causes any difficulties.

Register your school

Register online for the Rights Respecting Schools Award

 
Children playing at St Mary’s C of E Primary School, Slough. © UNICEF UK/2009/RRS/Howard Davies
Children playing together in morning break at St Mary’s C of E Primary School, Slough.© UNICEF UK/2009/RRS/Howard Davies