21 November 2011

The number of famine areas across south Somalia has decreased, according to the latest survey findings from the Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit in Somalia published on 18 November.

"Thanks to the strong support from donors around the world since famine was declared in July, thousands of children's lives have been saved," said UNICEF’s Representative to Somalia, Sikander Khan. 

However, while levels of acute malnutrition and mortality have declined in many areas, including Bay, Bakool and Lower Shabelle, large parts of southern Somalia, including Middle Shabelle, Afgoye and Mogadishu, remain in famine. 

And large-scale disease outbreaks continue to make children extremely vulnerable to death and disease over the coming months. 
    
"Let’s make no mistake about this ongoing situation," said Khan. "Children’s lives are still in imminent danger." 

The generous support from the public has enabled us to scale up our emergency assistance to the most vulnerable children and families.

To date, around a million people have received nutrition, including 135,000 severely malnourished children. In addition, over a million children have received emergency measles vaccinations, 1.4 million people have access to UNICEF-supplied health care facilities, and 1.8 million people have access to safe water.

We now urgently need $62 million (£40 million) by the end of November to meet families' needs for 2011 and provide life-saving nutrition and health supplies into the new year.

 
In July 2011, a woman smiles, holding her baby and standing outside their makeshift tent in the Badbado camp in Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia. © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-1187/Kate Holt
In July 2011, a woman smiles, holding her baby and standing outside their makeshift tent in the Badbado camp in Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia.© UNICEF/NYHQ2011-1187/Kate Holt

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