More than £1 million was raised for children in a single day when the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited our supply centre to highlight the humanitarian crisis in East Africa.

Following the visit on 2 November, more than £1 million was donated in the UK alone. This combines thousands of public donations as well as ‘in-kind’ support, including free cargo space from British Airways and UPS, as well as life saving supplies to the value of £520,000 from the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation.

Visits to our website increased by 226 per cent on the day, and the appeal was a hot topic in the blogosphere and on Twitter, with high profile supporters including Roger Moore and Eddie Izzard tweeting throughout the day.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge accompanied The Crown Prince and Crown Princess of Denmark on a tour of the UNICEF warehouse and helped to pack boxes of emergency health kits, each of which will provide life-saving supplies to over 1,000 people.

During the visit, the Duke said: "An incredible amount is being done. UNICEF is leading the way and doing a fantastic job, but sadly there’s lots more still to do, and that’s why we’re here today".

He then added a heartfelt appeal: "Anyone who can do anything to help, please do".

So far, UNICEF has treated 108,000 severely malnourished children in therapeutic feeding centres, vaccinated 1.2 million children against measles and provided 2.2 million people with access to safe water.

However, the region is currently experiencing the worst drought in decades and much more needs to be done to help the many thousands of children who need urgent nutritional and medical help.

 
Prince William handles a sachet of life-saving peanut paste while Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge listens to a UNICEF specialist during theirt recent visit to our supply centre. © UNICEF 2011/Jan Grarup
Prince William handles a sachet of life-saving peanut paste while Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge listens to a UNICEF specialist during theirt recent visit to our supply centre.© UNICEF 2011/Jan Grarup