The five-in-one, or pentavalent vaccine is a real innovation.

It's a single vaccine that protects children against five potentially lethal diseases: tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough), Hepatitus B and Haemopghilus Influenzae B (which causes meningitis and pneumonia).

It's currently used in around 170 countries, and is increasingly being given to children in poorer countries. In 2010, UNICEF bought 97 million doses.

Having five vaccines in one is also a real help for the health workers who are doing the vaccinating.

It means they have fewer sorts of vaccines to carry and administer, so far less data to collect when they're immunising children. This all means their efforts can reach more children.

Learn more about our immunisation work.

 
In northern Rwanda, 2011, a baby receives the new pentavalent vaccine at an immunisation clinic © UNICEF/RWAA2011-00406/Shehzad Noorani
In northern Rwanda, 2011, a baby receives the new pentavalent vaccine at an immunisation clinic© UNICEF/RWAA2011-00406/Shehzad Noorani

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