As part of the Child Rights Partners programme, each local authority partner has chosen a specific area of work within which to explore and evaluate the application of a child rights-based approach. These fall under four overarching themes:

Commissioning: commissioning plays an increasingly prominent role in how public services are developed and delivered. We are developing a process to help local authorities incorporate child rights principles throughout the commissioning cycle to secure better outcomes for children and young people.

Social work: social work is said to be a human rights profession, grounded in the values of social justice and equality. Starting with services for children who are in or leaving local authority care, we are working with social workers and corporate parenting boards to ensure children’s rights are upheld in every day practice.  

Child poverty: the experience of poverty can have a damaging and limiting impact on children and young people’s lives, both now and in the future. We are establishing ways of using the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child as a tool to strengthen local child poverty strategies in the UK.

Planning, strategy and governance: for a child rights-based approach to make a real and lasting difference, it’s essential that child rights thinking and action are embedded at the highest levels of local decision-making. So, we’re working with local policy officers, service directors and elected members to make sure that local plans are underpinned by child rights principles and that local politicians and key decision-makers understand their duties and responsibilities and how to put children’s rights into practice.

Read more about who our local authority partners are and what themes they're focusing on.

Child Rights Partners' areas of focus © John Birdsall Photography
Uncief UK's Child Rights Partners programme is exploring the application of a child rights-based approach in three core areas of public services: children's social work, the commissioning process and child poverty.© John Birdsall Photography