Research on skin-to-skin contact

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Below is a selection of studies exploring the impact of skin-to-skin contact on infant and maternal health. Find out more about how skin-to-skin works.

The effects of kangaroo mother care on the time to breastfeeding initiation among preterm and low birthweight infants: a meta-analysis of published studies

This review of studies found that preterm and low birthweight infants receiving a kangaroo mother care intervention initiated breastfeeding 2 days 14 h 24 min earlier than infants who received the “conventional” care of the radiant warmer/incubator method.

Mekonnen, A, Yehualashet, S and Bayleyegn, D, (2019). The effects of kangaroo mother care on the time to breastfeeding initiation among preterm and low birthweight infants: a meta-analysis of published studies. International Breastfeeding Journal, doi.org/10.1186/s13006-019-0206-0

Effects of paternal skin-to-skin contact in newborns and fathers after cesarean delivery

This study of neonates born via elective cesarean delivery and their fathers investigated the effects of paternal skin-to-skin contact (SSC) on newborns and fathers after cesarean delivery. Newborns who received SSC shortly after delivery had a more stable heart rate and forehead temperature, less duration of crying, and started feeding behavior earlier. The duration of breastfeeding after SSC in the treatment group was longer as well, with statistical significance, than the control group. In addition, fathers in the treatment group had lower scores of anxiety and depression and better role attainment than those in the control group, with statistical significance.

Xiaoli Huang, Liling Chen, & Li Zhang, (2019). Effects of paternal skin-to-skin contact in newborns and fathers after cesarean delivery. Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing 2019, 33 (1): 68-73

Hospital breastfeeding support and exclusive breastfeeding by maternal prepregnancy BMI

This US study explored the impact of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding on supporting breastfeeding amongst mothers with obesity, who have disproportionately lower rates of exclusive breastfeeding than mothers who are not obese. Researchers found that holding babies in skin-to-skin contact for the first time and being encouraged to feed on demand were more strongly associated with exclusive breastfeeding among mothers with obesity than other mothers. Additionally, mothers with obesity reported holding babies skin‐to‐skin significantly less often than other mothers. They concluded that interventions aimed at helping mothers with obesity to hold their babies skin‐to‐skin in the first hour and teaching them to breastfeed on demand have the potential to decrease the breastfeeding disparities in this population.

Kair, L, Nickel, N, Jones, K, et al, (2019). Hospital breastfeeding support and exclusive breastfeeding by maternal pre‐pregnancy BMI. Maternal & Child Nutrition, doi.org/10.1111/mcn.12783

Who owns the baby? A video ethnography of skin-to-skin contact after a caesarean section

This video ethnography of skin-to-skin contact highlights the impact of the operating theatre environment on health professionals’ actions and mothers’ perceptions of closeness and ‘ownership’ of their babies. They found that the maternal body was divided in the operating theatre and mothers were perceived as ‘separate’ from their baby in the operating theatre and recovery. Obstetricians’ were viewed to ‘own’ the lower half of women; anaesthetists were viewed to ‘own’ the top half and midwives were viewed to ‘own’ the baby after birth. Midwives’ responsibility for the baby either negatively or positively affected the mother’s ability to ‘own’ her baby, because midwives controlled what maternal-infant contact occurred. Mothers desired closeness with their baby, including skin-to-skin contact, however they realised that ‘owning’ their baby in the surgical environment could be challenging. The authors emphasise the importance of skin-to-skin contact and avoiding maternal-infant separation.

Stevens, J, Schmied, V, et al (2018). Who owns the baby? A video ethnography of skin-to-skin contact after a caesarean section. Women and Birth, doi.org/10.1016/j.wombi.2018.02.005

Mapping, measuring, and analyzing the process of skin-to-skin contact and early breastfeeding in the first hour after birth

Researchers in this study explored the practice of skin-to-skin contact in a Baby Friendly designated hospital in the US. The algorithm used in the study enabled the authors to identify instances in which optimal skin-to-skin contact (i.e. immediately after birth) had not occurred, for example following emergent caesarean birth, and in turn highlighted opportunities for targeted interventions such as additional staff training.

Cadwell, K, Brimdyr, K, et al (2018). Mapping, measuring, and analyzing the process of skin-to-skin contact and early breastfeeding in the first hour after birth. Breastfeeding Medicine, doi.org/10.1089/bfm.2018.0048

An implementation algorithm to improve skin‐to‐skin practice in the first hour after birth

This algorithm seeks to analyse the implementation of skin‐to‐skin care in the first hour after birth in order to explore the successes, barriers, and opportunities for improvement to achieving this standard of care for babies.

Brimdyr, K, Cadwell, K, et al, (2017). An implementation algorithm to improve skin‐to‐skin practice in the first hour after birth. Maternal & Child Nutrition, doi.org/10.1111/mcn.12571

An analysis of the effects of intrapartum factors, neonatal characteristics, and skin-to-skin contact on early breastfeeding initiation

This study of 915 mother-newborn dyads found that skin-to-skin contact, mode of birth, labour duration and neonatal unit admission were all significantly associated with likelihood of early breastfeeding initiation. For example, women with immediate skin-to-skin contact were more likely to initiate early breastfeeding across different modes of birth, and in the spontaneous vaginal birth group, women showed a lower likelihood of initiating early breastfeeding when their neonates were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit and presented an Apgar score of <7 at 1 min. The findings demonstrate the importance of prioritising immediate skin-to-skin contact to support mothers to get breastfeeding off to a good start.

Lau, Y, et al (2017), An analysis of the effects of intrapartum factors, neonatal characteristics, and skin-to-skin contact on early breastfeeding initiation, Maternal & Child Nutrition, DOI: 10.1111/mcn.12492

Early skin-to-skin contact for mothers and their healthy newborn infants

This review of randomized control trials examined the impact of early skin-to-skin contact on breastfeeding and infant physiology. Researchers found that skin-to-skin contact supported both the establishment and maintenance of breastfeeding. There was also some evidence to suggest a positive impact on the stability of the cardio-respiratory system in infants who received skin-to-skin, although larger sample sizes would be needed to support this further.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD003519.pub4/full

Kangaroo mother care for preterm infants

A 20 year follow-up study of the impact of kangaroo care (KMC, or skin-to-skin contact) on preterm and low birthweight babies found significant, long-lasting social and behavioural protective effects even 20 years after the intervention. The effects of KMC at one year on IQ and home environment were still present 20 years later in the most fragile individuals, reflected by reduced school absenteeism and reduced hyperactivity, aggressiveness, externalization, and socio-deviant conduct of young adults. Neuroimaging showed larger volume of the left caudate nucleus in the KMC group.

Charpak, N (2016), Twenty-year Follow-up of Kangaroo Mother Care Versus Traditional Care. Pediatrics 139(1):e20162063

Healthy Birth Practice #6: Keep Mother and Baby Together – It’s Best for Mother, Baby, and Breastfeeding

This review explores the evidence supporting the value of immediate, uninterrupted skin-to-skin care after vaginal birth and during and after cesarean surgery for all stable mothers and babies, regardless of feeding preference. The authors argue that unlimited opportunities for skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding promote optimal maternal and child outcomes.

Crenshaw, JT, (2014). Healthy Birth Practice #6: Keep Mother and Baby Together- It’s Best for Mother, Baby, and Breastfeeding, Journal of Perinatal Education, doi: 10.1891/1058-1243.23.4.211

Effect of kangaroo care on physical growth and breastfeeding

This study of 110 neonates found that the use of kangaroo care improved the infants’ physical growth and increased breastfeeding rates.

Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on physical growth, breastfeeding and its acceptability. Geeta Gathwala, Bir Singh, and Jagjit Singh, Trop Doct. 2010; 40(4): p. 199-202.

Benefits of skin-to-skin to baby and mother

A review of 34 studies found that skin-to-skin contact improved breastfeeding rates, infant cardio-respiratory stability and blood glucose levels.

Anderson GC, Moore E, Hepworth J, Bergman N. Early skin-to-skin contact for mothers and their healthy newborn infants (Cochrane Review). In: The Cochrane Library, Issue 2 2003. Oxford: Update Software.