In July 2011 Unicef and Marks & Spencer launched a partnership that will transform the lives of some of the world's poorest children.

Marks & Spencer are asking customers not to take a hanger home when they buy clothes and in return they will donate 50p for every £1 saved from hanger recycling to Unicef.

The aim is to raise at least £1.9million over the next three years. This will fund a critical new project in two locations in the Mymensingh and Dhaka regions of Bangladesh, providing the basics children need for a better future, such as clean water, education and healthcare. 

"By simply leaving their hangers at the tills our customers are helping us, helping Unicef and helping some of the world’s poorest children", says Marc Bolland, Chief Executive Officer of Marks & Spencer.

"Just one box of hangers can provide a child with clean water for a fortnight. We are very proud of our Unicef partnership and believe it can make a big difference to families and communities in Bangladesh, a country we have a large presence in with a regional office and 38 supplier factories."

Unicef Ambassador and TV presenter Cat Deeley is supporting the initiative. "There are countries where children live without access to running water, education or healthcare", she says.

"Doing your bit to help could change the plight of many, and, what’s more, you’ll be helping the environment too as these recycled hangers won’t end up in a landfill site. So, on your next shopping spree, leave the hangers at the till and help transform lives."

 
Marks & Spencer logo © Marks & Spencer
Marks & Spencer logo© Marks & Spencer
UNICEF UK Ambassador and TV presenter Cat Deeley is supporting the initiative. © Marks & Spencer
UNICEF UK Ambassador and TV presenter Cat Deeley is supporting the initiative. © Marks & Spencer